Gregory Yee, former Publish and Courier breaking information and crime reporter, dies at 33 | Information

Gregory Yee, former Publish and Courier breaking information and crime reporter, dies at 33 | Information

Gregory Yee, a former Publish and Courier reporter who introduced verve and compassion to breaking information protection, died Jan. 4 at his house in Los Angeles. He was 33.

Yee died unexpectedly resulting from problems from a respiratory concern, his household informed The Los Angeles Instances, the place he labored as a reporter.

The Los Angeles native graduated in 2012 from UC Irvine, the place he served as editor in chief for the coed newspaper, The New College. Yee held a few information jobs on the West Coast earlier than choosing up and transferring to Charleston in 2016 to cowl breaking information and felony justice at The Publish and Courier. 

Right here, Yee coated an assortment of points — gun violence, excessive climate, clowns — with enthusiasm and composure. 


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Yee introduced consideration to deplorable residing circumstances — cockroaches, rats, mice and mud — in Floyd Manor, a public housing constructing on the higher Charleston peninsula for senior residents and other people with disabilities, forcing public officers to spend money on Charleston’s weak residents.

He documented with precision and empathy how racial justice protests in the summertime of 2020 devolved into rioting in South Carolina’s oldest metropolis.


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He led the newspaper’s protection of an April 2021 mass capturing in Rock Hill by a former NFL participant that despatched shockwaves by means of the city. Throughout the span of a information cycle, Yee and a crew of reporters tried to supply solutions amid chaos and elevate voices of individuals hit hardest by the violence. 

He left the newspaper in the summertime of 2021 for The Los Angeles Instances, which supplied him a chance to interrupt the information that formed his hometown.


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Yee was a pillar of The Publish and Courier’s neighborhood of reporters each out and in of the newsroom.

Present and former reporters on the newspaper remembered his highly effective snicker, mild nature and skill to convey folks collectively over a home-cooked meal.

Deanna Pan, now a reporter at The Boston Globe, recalled how the power within the newsroom shifted when Yee arrived to work the night time shift.

“A joke from Greg, or a burst of his laughter, might unbind no matter tedium and drudgery mired us,” she stated. “He reminded us why we do the work that we do as a result of he confirmed us day by day the depth of affection people are able to.”

“Greg was endlessly beneficiant together with his time, his spirit and his abilities,” stated Thad Moore, an investigative reporter for the newspaper. “His empathy and thoughtfulness infused his reporting and his friendships. His enthusiasm, power and snicker made this newsroom particular for a era of us.”

Thomas Novelly, who labored with Yee in Charleston and now experiences for army.com, was reminded of knowledgeable axiom: human first, journalist second.

“Greg by no means needed to be reminded of that. He knew how you can completely stability these two roles,” Novelly stated. “He was a devoted journalist whose relentless pursuit of tales by no means hindered him from being a devoted good friend to everybody within the newsroom. He was a uncommon breed and he’ll be missed.”

Former digital editor Brooks Brunson remembers assembly Yee in 2016 on Yee’s first day of labor at The Publish and Courier.

The California man was arduous to overlook.

“He had on a Hawaiian shirt and he at the moment had actually lengthy hair and he had this massive bun on prime of his head,” Brunson stated.

They shortly grew to become shut buddies, bonding over Yerba mate tea and dealing late nights. Finally, they moved in along with one other reporter in a home in Wagener Terrace, the place Yee cooked breakfast each morning.

“One of many heartbreaking issues is I’ll by no means have a Greg meal once more,” stated Brunson, who’s Head Viewers Editor of New York Public Radio’s WNYC.

Along with grilling for his buddies, she added, Yee learn poetry, drove a stick shift, spoke fluent Spanish and performed the saxophone.

Yee’s father informed the L.A. Instances of his son’s inquisitiveness. 

“He was at all times inquisitive about every thing,” Andrew Yee informed The Instances. “I take consolation in realizing Gregory got here again to L.A. and was thriving on the paper. He stated he felt like (journalism) was a calling, prefer it’s in his genes to do it.”

Yee is survived by his dad and mom and two sisters.